WineAccess Travel Log


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Chateau Pontet Canet
In the early 18th century, Jean Francois de Pontet, Royal Governor of the Medoc, purchased several vineyards and united them under the banner of Pontet. In the heart of Pauillac, the estate at Canet was neighbor to Mouton to the South. Despite their proximity, however, Pontet Canet slipped all the way to Fifth Growth in the classification of 1855 due to poor management. Languishing, the estate sold to Herman Cruse in 1865. Heavy investment reversed the fortunes of Chateau Pontet Canet until 1973 when the House of Cruse found itself in the midst of an ugly fraud scandal. Although the charges were eventually dropped, the name of Cruse had suffered immensely and the family was all but forced to sell Pontet Canet to cognac magnate Guy Tesseron in 1975.

Today, Guy's son Alfred manages the 80 hectare vineyard, which is planted to 62% Cabernet Sauvignon, 32% Merlot, 4% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot. 45 year old vines benefit from the gravelly, well draining Pauillac soil; grapes achieve maximum concentration from green harvesting techniques, and what emerges are wines of near-first growth class, with rich, concentrated cassis fruit and lush texture. The Grand Vin is Chateau Pontet Canet, of which approximately 20,000 cases are made each year, making Pontet Canet one of the largest producers among Medoc classified growths.

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