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Kim Crawford Chardonnay Unoaked Marlborough
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4.0 average rating 16 ratingsrate it

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Member Notes

Perfect Apertif
07/02/2007
by Vino del Journo
Kim Crawford Chardonnay was a big hit with my friends as an apertif on a sunny afternoon
An excellent chardonnay
03/22/2008
by vinotek
If you don't like your chardonnay in oak, this is the wine for you. My wife and I had this at a seafood restaurant and it was just as perfect with the raw oysters as it was with the fish soup as it was with the grilled sea bass. Look for this one and give it a try.
No cork needed
11/29/2007
by Johnston12499244
We served Kim Crawford Chardonnay at Thanksgiving dinner. Everyone laughed at the screwcap, until they tasted the wine. Nice, very nice...
New Zealand Chardonnay
11/04/2006
by tippiphillipi060520
The Kim Crawford Chardonnay unoaked is outstanding. at a recent dinner for 4 we all agreed heartily on our selection and then ordered a second bottle. and to think I always liked oak-y chardonnay.
02/05/2006
by Burklow11930253
Refreshing and without the oiliness of some.

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About New Zealand

New Zealand's ocean-influenced climate--markedly cooler than that of its neighbor Australia--yields wines with admirable fruit intensity and crisp acidity. Fully two-thirds of New Zealand's wine production is white, and more than half of the wine it ships to America is Sauvignon Blanc. The U.S. market has developed a major thirst for these juicy, fresh New Zealand Sauvignons, which are mostly free of oak influence. But New Zealand Pinot Noir, too, is growing...
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Chardonnay

The best Chardonnays in the world continue to arrive from the region where the grape first emerged: the chalk, clay, and limestone vineyards of Burgundy and Chablis. While the origins of the grape were disputed for many years, with some speculating that the grape came all the way from the Middle East, DNA researchers at the University of California-Davis proved in 1999 that Chardonnay actually developed...
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