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2008 Castellare di Castellina Poggio ai Merli Toscano Rosso
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Expert Ratings
ST
 89
WS
 88
 RP
  92+
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Product Details

About Castellare di Castellina

The product of five farms joined together, Castellare di Castellina lies near the village of Castellare in the heart of Chianti Classico. Formed in 1968, Castellare covers 80 hectares, 33 of which are planted to a mix of Italian and Bordeaux varieties, namely Sangiovese, Canaiolo, and Cabernet.

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2008 Castellare di Castellina Poggio ai Merli Toscano Rosso

Producer: Castellare di Castellina
Style: Red Wine
Grape Type: Merlot
Origin: Italy
Region: Tuscany

Expert Reviews

89 Points | International Wine Cellar , July/August 2010

(100% merlot done in large oak casks and barriques; 34 g/l dry extract) Inky ruby. The initially closed nose offers fresh black plum, bay leaf and milk chocolate with aeration. Enters the mouth creamy and rich, showing enticing flavors of dark berries, minerals and chocolate. The finish features youthfully chewy tannins that are considerably smoother than some overextracted vintages of the past, and a pretty violet note.

88 Points | Wine Spectator
92+ Points | Robert Parker's The Wine Advocate

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About Italy

Italy, like France, offers a world of wine styles within a single country: dry Italian white wines ranging from lively and minerally to powerful and full-bodied; cheap and cheerful Italian red wines in both a cooler, northern style and a richer, warmer southern style; structured, powerful reds capable of long aging in bottle; sparkling wines; sweet wines and dessert wines.
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Merlot

Merlot enjoyed a surge in popularity in the 1990s as consumers suddenly discovered that they could enjoy aromas and flavors similar to those of Cabernet in a fleshier, softer wine with smoother tannins. A wave of Merlot plantings followed, frequently in soils and microclimates completely inappropriate for this variety, and the market was soon...
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