Label Image
1989 Chateau d'Yquem Sauternes
Find the Lowest Priceavailable from 3 retailers online
5.0 average rating 2 ratingsrate it
Expert Ratings
ST
 97
WS
 97
RP
 97
read the reviews

Begin Your Search


WineAccess Travel Log


Read stories from the world's greatest wine trails.

Product Details

Place Image
About Chateau d'Yquem

For centuries Y'quem has been unchallenged as the finest example of Sauternes and the most famous sweet wine in the world...

Read more about Chateau d'Yquem »

1989 Chateau d'Yquem Sauternes

Producer: Chateau d'Yquem
Style: Sweet Wine
Grape Type: Semillon
Origin: France
Region: Bordeaux
Appellation: Sauternes and Barsac

Expert Reviews

Free One Month Trial


Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar will make you a smarter wine consumer, no matter what your budget or level of expertise.

Get unlimited access to the IWC for one month – FREE!


97 Points | Stephen Tanzer's IWC - July/August 1998

Laid-back, extremely young aromas of honey, creme caramel, smoke and earth; essence of semillon. Rich, large-scaled and powerful; really expands in the mouth. Lovely harmonious acidity and bright notes of orange peel and minerals give this very youthful wine great clarity of flavor. Classy and impeccably balanced. The subtle, oak-spicy, nutty finish goes on and on. Conveys an almost saline impression of extract. This should approach peak drinkability within the next eight to ten years and last for decades.

97 Points | Wine Spectator
97 Points | Robert Parker's The Wine Advocate

Member Ratings

Your Rating & Review
2 Member Ratings
Average Member Rating:
5.0 out of 5 stars
     
5 stars
 
(2)
     
4 stars
 
(0)
     
3 stars
 
(0)
     
2 stars
 
(0)
     
1 stars
 
(0)
     

Explore

Place Image
About Bordeaux

Bordeaux is the planet's largest source of fine wine, the model for Cabernet Sauvignon- and Merlot-based wines around the globe. Bordeaux wines are considered by many wine connoisseurs to be the world's greatest reds.


Read More »

Varietal Image
Semillon

Semillon is a paradoxical grape, as much of its appeal stems from its susceptibility to rot. Sure, the idea of rot may conjure up nasty images, but in winemaking, rot isn't necessarily a negative. Grapes can be affected by two types of rot: grey rot and noble rot, also known as Botrytis. While the former is a destructive force, diminishing yields and making wines taste...
Read More »