Across the wine world, different regions are known for both producing different grapes and different styles of wine.

The distinction between Old World wine regions and New World wine regions is particularly important: as a sweeping generalization, Old World regions are known for producing wines that are more austere and terroir driven, while New World regions are known for producing wines with greater intensity. For example, Cabernet Sauvignon grapes grown in France will likely produce wines marked by earthiness and subtle fruit flavors, while Cabernet Sauvignon grapes grown in California will likely produce wines that are more fruit-forward.

But different wine regions are also often associated with the production of different grapes. For example, within France, Bordeaux is associated with red wines made primarily from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc grapes, while Burgundy is associated with red wines made from the Pinot Noir grape. Use this page to learn about these wine regions and others throughout the world.